MarkWest officials address cleanup

 

MarkWest cleanup 6-1

Robert McHale pictured, manager of environmental and government affairs with MarkWest Energy, reviews wetlands near the Jockey Hollow Wildlife Area outside where a clay and water mixture used in horizontal directional drilling spilled last fall.

McHale said a group of workers spent several months carefully removing the non-toxic mixture and is working with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, which issued an administrative order after the company had eight such events, known as inadvertent returns, since late last year.

As MarkWest Energy Partners continues to negotiate findings and orders amid clay slurry spills in the area, company officials stress that protecting the environment is of the utmost importance.

Details of the cleanup are featured in the June 1, 2013 edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

NH Photo/AMY GAREIS

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3 Comments

 
  1. Ron
    2013-06-04
    21:45:25

    How can we be protected from chemicials when we don`t even know what chemicials they are using. They won`t tell us about the cancer causing chemicials they are using or when they are using them. Thank your commissioners, city council & our govern for us being in this situtition. Remember them at election time. Cancer kills, so do their chemicials that they won`t tell you about .........

     
  2. RET
    2013-06-06
    01:29:12

    There is ZERO PROOF that fracking has ever caused any cancer or any other diseases. The left wing "green energy" folks want you to believe this so they can continue to give billions of taxpayers dollars to fund wind and solar energy. Most of these wind and solar companies are owned by donors who support the Democrat party. This country could be energy independent within a decade if we are allowed to drill OUR OWN oil instead of buying it from countries who hate us.

     
  3. Ron
    2013-06-06
    11:21:58

    The composition of the fracking fluid is proprietary to each company -- and a trade secret. In addition, frackers don't have to comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act. Therefore, it's unknown what chemicals could ultimately be leached into the water table decades, or even just years, from now. When they have spills above ground these chemicals can react much quicker.

     
 

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