Top Story

Accident Shuts Down 250

Accident Shuts Down 250

TAPPAN LAKE – A truck driver with Texas license plates crashed his dump truck over an embankment this morning and stopped from going into the lake only by several trees. The unknown driver suffered injuries but Ohio State Patrol on the scene did not describe them as serious at this time. Rescue units from Harrison Community Hospital, Cadiz, Bowerston, Scio and Tappan were on the scene where the man was taken to Trinity Hospital Twin Cities in Dennison. Traffic was stopped in both directions for approximately one hour. Possibly high speed and a blown tire was speculated as the cause of the accident. For further details see our April 29, print edition.

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Painted rock craze sweeps through Harrison County

Painted rock craze sweeps through Harrison County

By Michael Sieber NH Editor   Who would’ve thought finding a painted rock while out on a walk through town or the park would be cause for celebration, but that’s exactly what’s going on in Harrison and surrounding counties. East Central Ohio Rocks is a group started in March of this year on Facebook by Cadiz resident, Linda Porter, which encourages people to not only paint and hide rocks, but to get out and look for them. “The group came about when I saw rocks posted by a group in Northeast Ohio. I joined that group, but quickly learned they would not officially include Harrison and surrounding counties because we are not in Northeast Ohio. It was suggested that we begin our own group,” said Porter. Porter says the group exists to show acts of random kindness to brighten someone’s day. She goes on to say that those who participate receive benefits as well. “When we are creating, our mind is moved away from the stress in our lives and issues in the world. When we hide rocks we are giving and that feels good.” Currently, the group includes Harrison, Belmont, Jefferson and Guernsey counties while Carroll and Tuscarawas are included in another group. Porter says it’s important to not infringe on another group’s territory as that will weaken that group. Membership is open to anyone and there are only a few rules: Be respectful; don’t paint foul language or insulting pictures on rocks; no advertising, and don’t paint political issues, hot topics or issues involving adult concerns on rocks. “We’re not that kind of group,” Porter says. How it works is a group member paints a rock, and hides it in a park or around town where it can be found. The finder then takes a photo of themselves and the rock and posts it to the group’s Facebook page using the appropriate hashtag. They then re-hide the rock in a different location for someone else to find. Once a member paints a rock, they can go to the group’s Facebook page to download hashtag files and add their own hashtags, which help people find postings on social media. Labels that read: “Find us on Facebook at East Central Ohio Rocks! Post a picture and re-hide me and use my hashtag to follow me,” can also be downloaded from the Facebook page. “I’ve been told that kids are asking their parents to get out and walk with them to find rocks. It’s getting people out in the fresh air to exercise and enjoy a little fun,” Porter said. Group member Cathy Cope Rose said, “My teenage granddaughters and I decided to join in. We have painted and hidden rocks . . . it’s really fun when someone finds a rock you painted. Linda has brought the community together and some of us have made new friends through this project.” While any rock can be painted, Porter says the best rocks are of the smooth variety, with the exception being polished rocks. She says she found small bags of rocks in the “dollar store,” but your best bet is to go to Lowes, Home Depot or a landscaping store where you can buy a bucket of decent rocks cheaply. To secure the hashtag labels to the rocks, Porter recommends using Mod Podge and to also use some type of sealer such as Duraclear to seal the paint. The group is growing every day, and as of this writing, the group is close to 500 members. According to Porter, the northeast group began in July of 2016 and now has 109,143 members. Anyone wanting to join the group can find them on Facebook. It’s a closed group, but Porter says all you need to do is send a friend request and she’ll add you to the group. “We’re hoping to get a group together soon for a painting party. We’re a new group, but we’re growing.”

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Chrisagis brothers to entertain at New Rumley UMC

Chrisagis brothers to entertain at New Rumley UMC

The New Rumley United Methodist Church will host The Chrisagis Brothers of Glen Dale, W.Va., at their Sunday morning worship service on April 30, at 9:15 a.m. The nationally known identical twin brothers will be sharing the love of Jesus in word, song, and testimony. All are invited to attend.  

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Hoagland, Kennedy Speak At Lincoln Day Dinner

Hoagland, Kennedy Speak At Lincoln Day Dinner

(Top to bottom): Sharon Kennedy, Frank Hoagland, Andy Thompson, Mary DeGenaro. NEW ATHENS – Current presence and new were on center stage at last Thursday’s Annual Lincoln Day Dinner, held once again at New Athens’ Franklin Museum. Along with Representative, Andy Thompson (R-District 95) and Mary DeGenaro of Ohio’s 7th District Court of Appeals, the large crowd took up every seat on hand to hear retired military and newly elected Senator, Frank Hoagland (R-District 30) and Ohio Supreme Court Justice, Sharon Kennedy speak on the topics of today. Vice Chairman of the Harrison County Republican Party, Barry Momeyer introduced the guest speakers while throwing in a few zingers himself, which partisan rhetoric seemed to be slightly heavier than in past years. Momeyer, before introducing the night’s keynote speaker stated how much he enjoyed introducing Hoagland and, “no longer do we have Lou Gentile there now, we have our representative for our district here, right here right now.” And when introducing Kennedy he joked that she was the “only liberal sounding name we can vote for,” which drew a healthy laugh. Kennedy spoke first commenting on her new, shorter-hair look and contact lenses and joking that some in the crowd might not have recognized her. She thanked the audience for inviting her back again and remembering her. Kennedy began by touching on her beginnings in Harrison County, which she said was 2011 and where she began working on the Bench back in 1999. “And I came here because I could see the future,” she said confidently. “You’re standing in the midst of the future as I told you then.” She said that her branch of government (judicial) “represents” a limited voice within the government. She spoke of the Constitution and the unalienable rights written by the Founding Fathers in the Declaration of Independence. Kennedy spoke of the Federalist Paper No. 78, where it states that the judicial branch is the “least dangerous branch because we do not raise a standing army nor can we raise a tax.” But she contradicted that statement by stating that it could be dangerous. She spoke of a “magical pen” and how her branch of government could be dangerous if it did not show judicial restraint noting President Ronald Reagan’s emphasis on a branch of checks and balances minus liberal or conservative leanings. “And we believe, as President Reagan did that the men and women don a black robe have a limited role in our government to enforce the law as it’s written…” Kennedy explained. She also spoke of the turnover within the state’s highest court through election commending the public’s help in doing so and the changes that have followed. “But you’re only halfway through the change…,” she said, adding that three new justices by 2022 will need to be elected. “It’s up to you to decide what the role in the third branch of government should be.” Hoagland followed by thanking God as his first thought shared and thanking God for his wife and family and for living in “the United States of America,” which drew huge applause. He said his heroes were the other men and women who served in the armed forces and the importance of that service “but as soon as you take that uniform off it doesn’t mean you stop serving.” He then spoke of what an honor it was to be standing before the audience as their state senator. “It’s not about me, it’s not about Frank Hoagland,” he told the large crowd. “It’s about people like my father who fought in Vietnam, they’re my heroes. These men and women who served and crossed the sea on distant lands wrote that blank check saying they would be willing to die for our Constitution. Those are the men and women who are my heroes.” Hoagland acknowledged his peers, the ones he said stood on each side of him and noted that they were the ones who taught him how “important to be part of a team.” “Our motto is team, teammate, self,” he said while emphasizing self in that sentence. He also reminded the crowd that, “our freedom is not free” while speaking of the many men and women currently serving around the world guarding posts night and day. Hoagland said his ambition was to be a Navy Seal because he heard they were “the toughest.” He began the journey, though, with three broken toes on his left foot and said the doctor basically questioned his intelligence in wanting to do something like this. He then touched on his senate experience and what it was like working in Columbus. He said that after spending 29 years working for the government as a military man he spelled it out in plain English: “We never have enough time for what we need to get done. Every place I’m supposed to be at I need to be somewhere else.” He continued by stating his frustration when speaking to someone that there are a handful of others waiting in the wings and no matter how hard he tries he said he “can’t try hard enough.” He also touched on fighting the war on drugs beginning in the 1980s and the men lost while chasing Pablo Escobar, who was eventually hunted down and killed by Columbian Police and other military forces. He was reminded one time of the fact that as long as there were people in America willing to take drugs there was someone in another country willing to provide it. “We together have to figure out the solution,” Hoagland explained and ended his speech to a standing ovation.

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Sheriff announces Drug Take-Back event

Sheriff announces Drug Take-Back event

Harrison County Sheriff Joe Myers announced the National Prescription Drug Take-Back spring event. Locally, the event will be held April 22 and 29 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Custer Pharmacy and Rite Aid in Cadiz, and at Neimayer Pharmacy in Scio. Each location will accept any unwanted, unneeded or expired prescription drugs for safe disposal. No liquids, please. According to Myers, the National Prescription Drug Take-Back event addresses a vital public safety and public health issue. Many residents are not aware when medicines languish in home cabinets they are highly susceptible to diversion, misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in this country are described as alarming, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses. Studies show that many abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including the home medicine cabinet. In addition, many Americans do not know how to properly dispose of their unused medicine, often flushing them down the toilet or tossing them in the trash can – both potential safety and health hazards. In previous DEA sponsored Take-Back events held from 2010-2105 a total of 5,525,021 pounds or 2,762,510.50 tons of drugs were collected. For more information, please contact the Harrison County Sheriff’s office at (740) 942-2197.

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Obituaries

Charles R. Murray

Charles R. Murray

Charles R. Murray, 68, of Georgetown, Ohio, died Monday, April 24, at the Adena Health and Rehabilitation Center in Harrisville. He was born October 10, 1948 in Wheeling, W.Va., a son of the late Charles A. and Mary Murray. Charles was a retired coal miner from Consolidation Coal Company. He was an avid fisherman anywhere there were crappies. He was a Vietnam Army veteran. Surviving are his wife, Mildred Howes Murray; a brother Michael Murray and a sister, Susan Murray, both of Mt. Pleasant. Friends may call Thursday, 5-8 p.m. at Clark-Kirkland Funeral Home, Cadiz, Ohio, where funeral services will be held Friday at 1:00 p.m. with Pastor Chad Ware officiating. Burial will follow at Highland Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Ohio. Online condolences may be made at www.clark-kirkland.com

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Area News

Accident Shuts Down 250

Accident Shuts Down 250

TAPPAN LAKE – A truck driver with Texas license plates crashed his dump truck over an embankment this morning and stopped from going into the lake only by several trees. The unknown driver suffered injuries but Ohio State Patrol on the scene did not describe them as serious at this time. Rescue units from Harrison Community Hospital, Cadiz, Bowerston, Scio and Tappan were on the scene where the man was taken to Trinity Hospital Twin Cities in Dennison. Traffic was stopped in both directions for approximately one hour. Possibly high speed and a blown tire was speculated as the cause of the accident. For further details see our April 29, print edition.

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Events

Chrisagis brothers to entertain at New Rumley UMC

Chrisagis brothers to entertain at New Rumley UMC

The New Rumley United Methodist Church will host The Chrisagis Brothers of Glen Dale, W.Va., at their Sunday morning worship service on April 30, at 9:15 a.m. The nationally known identical twin brothers will be sharing the love of Jesus in word, song, and testimony. All are invited to attend.  

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Recent Stories

 
Charles R. Murray

Charles R. Murray

Charles R. Murray, 68, of Georgetown, Ohio, died Monday, April 24, at the Adena Health and Rehabilitation Center in Harrisville. He was born October 10, 1948 in Wheeling, W.Va., a son of the late Charles A. and Mary Murray. Charles was a retired coal miner from Consolidation Coal Company. He was an avid fisherman anywhere there were crappies. He was a Vietnam Army veteran. Surviving are his wife, Mildred Howes Murray; a brother Michael Murray and a sister, Susan Murray, both of Mt. Pleasant. Friends may call Thursday, 5-8 p.m. at Clark-Kirkland Funeral Home, Cadiz, Ohio, where funeral services will be held Friday at 1:00 p.m. with Pastor Chad Ware officiating. Burial will follow at Highland Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Ohio. Online condolences may be made at www.clark-kirkland.com

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Accident Shuts Down 250

Accident Shuts Down 250

TAPPAN LAKE – A truck driver with Texas license plates crashed his dump truck over an embankment this morning and stopped from going into the lake only by several trees. The unknown driver suffered injuries but Ohio State Patrol on the scene did not describe them as serious at this time. Rescue units from Harrison Community Hospital, Cadiz, Bowerston, Scio and Tappan were on the scene where the man was taken to Trinity Hospital Twin Cities in Dennison. Traffic was stopped in both directions for approximately one hour. Possibly high speed and a blown tire was speculated as the cause of the accident. For further details see our April 29, print edition.

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Painted rock craze sweeps through Harrison County

Painted rock craze sweeps through Harrison County

By Michael Sieber NH Editor   Who would’ve thought finding a painted rock while out on a walk through town or the park would be cause for celebration, but that’s exactly what’s going on in Harrison and surrounding counties. East Central Ohio Rocks is a group started in March of this year on Facebook by Cadiz resident, Linda Porter, which encourages people to not only paint and hide rocks, but to get out and look for them. “The group came about when I saw rocks posted by a group in Northeast Ohio. I joined that group, but quickly learned they would not officially include Harrison and surrounding counties because we are not in Northeast Ohio. It was suggested that we begin our own group,” said Porter. Porter says the group exists to show acts of random kindness to brighten someone’s day. She goes on to say that those who participate receive benefits as well. “When we are creating, our mind is moved away from the stress in our lives and issues in the world. When we hide rocks we are giving and that feels good.” Currently, the group includes Harrison, Belmont, Jefferson and Guernsey counties while Carroll and Tuscarawas are included in another group. Porter says it’s important to not infringe on another group’s territory as that will weaken that group. Membership is open to anyone and there are only a few rules: Be respectful; don’t paint foul language or insulting pictures on rocks; no advertising, and don’t paint political issues, hot topics or issues involving adult concerns on rocks. “We’re not that kind of group,” Porter says. How it works is a group member paints a rock, and hides it in a park or around town where it can be found. The finder then takes a photo of themselves and the rock and posts it to the group’s Facebook page using the appropriate hashtag. They then re-hide the rock in a different location for someone else to find. Once a member paints a rock, they can go to the group’s Facebook page to download hashtag files and add their own hashtags, which help people find postings on social media. Labels that read: “Find us on Facebook at East Central Ohio Rocks! Post a picture and re-hide me and use my hashtag to follow me,” can also be downloaded from the Facebook page. “I’ve been told that kids are asking their parents to get out and walk with them to find rocks. It’s getting people out in the fresh air to exercise and enjoy a little fun,” Porter said. Group member Cathy Cope Rose said, “My teenage granddaughters and I decided to join in. We have painted and hidden rocks . . . it’s really fun when someone finds a rock you painted. Linda has brought the community together and some of us have made new friends through this project.” While any rock can be painted, Porter says the best rocks are of the smooth variety, with the exception being polished rocks. She says she found small bags of rocks in the “dollar store,” but your best bet is to go to Lowes, Home Depot or a landscaping store where you can buy a bucket of decent rocks cheaply. To secure the hashtag labels to the rocks, Porter recommends using Mod Podge and to also use some type of sealer such as Duraclear to seal the paint. The group is growing every day, and as of this writing, the group is close to 500 members. According to Porter, the northeast group began in July of 2016 and now has 109,143 members. Anyone wanting to join the group can find them on Facebook. It’s a closed group, but Porter says all you need to do is send a friend request and she’ll add you to the group. “We’re hoping to get a group together soon for a painting party. We’re a new group, but we’re growing.”

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Jeanne Elizabeth Wilson

Jeanne Elizabeth Wilson

Jeanne Elizabeth Wilson, 92, of Charlotte passed away on Wednesday, April 12, at Sardis Oaks in Charlotte, N.C., formerly of Jewett. She was born on Oct. 22,1924 in New Rumley, Ohio to the late Stephen Merle Cunningham and Hettie Harriman Cunningham. Jeanne was a talented artist who enjoyed her family and her art. She attended the Art Institute of Pittsburgh and worked as a window designer for Kauffmans of Pittsburgh, Pa. She then returned to Jewett where she married and continue her art. She was a member of the Steubenville Art Association where she earned many awards. She also held many of her own art shows and taught her skills to many through her classes. She will be remembered for her kindness and love for all she knew. In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her husband Gerald C. “Snuffy” Wilson, her siblings Gwen, Tom, and Joyce. Jeanne is survived by her children, Steve (Judy) Wilson of Durham, N.C., Ed Wilson of Myrtle Beach, S.C., Holly (Brian) Cumberworth of Jewett. Her grandchildren Hettie, Oliver, Nic, and Nate. Great grandchildren, Mitchell, Jackson, and Ned. Services will be held April 30 at the Jewett United Methodist Church in Jewett, Oh. Visitation will be 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. Service at 2 p.m. Jeanne’s family asks that friends and family bring a piece of her artwork to her memorial to share. Memorials may also be sent to the Jewett United Methodist Church in her memory.

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Patricia M. (Lee) Goodson

Patricia M. (Lee) Goodson

Patricia M. (Lee) Goodson, age 77, of Freeport, Ohio, formerly of Akron, Ohio passed away Tuesday, April 18. She was the daughter of the late Frank and Eulalia (Rutledge) Lee. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Jerry, and daughter, Patricia. She is survived by her daughter, Marcie (Rick) Moore; son, Buzz Heston; stepchildren, T.R. Goodson, and Caren (Harv) Chapin; 10 grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; brother, Robert (Sandy) Lee; special friends, Becky and Robin; and caregiver, Tanya. Following cremation a graveside service will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 29, at Nottingham Cemetery in Moorefield, Ohio with Pastor Sandra Cappel officiating. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Freeport Public Library. Arrangements under the direction of Karlo-Libby Funeral Home.

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A. Rose Meadows

A. Rose Meadows

A. Rose Meadows, 106, of Mulberry, Fla., formerly of Cadiz, Ohio and Elkins, W.Va., died Sunday, April 16, in Mulberry. She was born March 11, 1911 in Elkins, W.Va., a daughter of the late James G. and Inez Duckworth Stalnaker. Mrs. Meadows was the retired Cafeteria Supervisor for Cadiz Exempted Village Schools. She was raised Presbyterian and was a former member of Harrison Hills United Pentecostal Church and the Cadiz Garden Club. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Fonso Taft Meadows in 1983; a daughter, Susan Dillon; a son, Richard Meadows; seven brothers, Elmer, Richard, Harold, Garfield, Ray, Earl, and Irvin Stalnaker; and two sisters, Katherine Sayre and Emma Mae VanAtta. Surviving are a son, Gary (Vickie) Meadows of Mulberry, Fla.; five grandchildren; seven great grandchildren; and two great great grandchildren. Friends may call Tuesday, April 25 from 6-8 p.m. at Clark-Kirkland Funeral Home, 172 Main St., Cadiz, Ohio where funeral services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at 11 a.m. with Rev. Erica Harley officiating. Burial will follow at Holly Memorial Gardens, Pleasant Grove, Ohio. Online condolences may be made at www.clark-kirkland.com

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Chrisagis brothers to entertain at New Rumley UMC

Chrisagis brothers to entertain at New Rumley UMC

The New Rumley United Methodist Church will host The Chrisagis Brothers of Glen Dale, W.Va., at their Sunday morning worship service on April 30, at 9:15 a.m. The nationally known identical twin brothers will be sharing the love of Jesus in word, song, and testimony. All are invited to attend.  

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Harry E. Hendricks

Harry E. Hendricks

Harry E. Hendricks 1928-2017 Harry E. Hendricks, age 88, of Perrysville passed away Saturday, April 15, in Carroll Co. Golden Age Retreat. Born Dec. 31, 1928 in Carroll Co. he was a son of the late Ben and Elizabeth Coultrap Hendricks. He graduated from Scio High School in 1946 where he excelled in sports, lettering for two years on the baseball team and three years in both football and basketball, with the honor of having his dad coach him in basketball. After graduating he attended The Ohio State University for a year. Harry married Nancy Grimes Hendricks on Dec. 25, 1948 and they purchased a farm near Perrysville. They also owned and operated H&N Shell in Perrysville for 10 years where Harry made his famous homemade ice cream. He also worked as a licensed insurance salesman and was a Perry Twp. Trustee for 16 years and Twp. Clerk for four years. Harry was a former member of the Carroll County Planning Commission and the former Perryville Grange and Perrysville Methodist Church. He continued in his father’s footsteps, coaching his sons Hot Stove Baseball team, the Perrysville Indians. He loved gardening and canning and was an avid collector especially coins and Jim Beam decanters. Surviving in addition to his wife are sons Dale Hendricks of Carrollton and Bob and Jim Hendricks both of Scio, six grandchildren, two step grandchildren and eleven great grandchildren.  Harry was preceded in death by brothers Ray and John Hendricks. Services will be held Friday at 11 a.m. in Koch Funeral Home, Scio. Burial will follow in Perrysville Cemetery. Friends may call Thursday from 5-8 p.m. at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to Crossroads Hospice, 3743 Boettler Oaks Dr, Suite E, Green, OH 44635. www.kochfuneral.com 740-945-6161

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Elaine Wood Kelley Young

Elaine Wood Kelley Young

Elaine Wood Kelley Young, 79, passed away Friday, April 14 surrounded by her family. She was born in Warnock, Ohio on Dec. 18, 1937 and was a lifelong resident of Harrison County. She was the daughter of Charles “Chick” Norris and Cora Belle Lemaster Norris. She was preceded in death by her parents and brothers Moonie, Homer; and sisters Josephine Norris, Sonja Waller, Anna Kopras, and a granddaughter, Kala. A sister, Sharel Elliot and a brother, Wayne Norris, survive. She is survived by eight children, Robert (Mary Ann) Wood of Steubenville; Janet Wood Dulkoski Ross of Cadiz; Brenda Wood Finn (Tim) Whiting of Pataskula; Ramona Wood (Terry) Ray of Cadiz; Marjorie Wood (Dale) Krafft of Alliance; Carolyn Wood (Dane) Hoffman of Harrisville; Mary Jane Wood (Jeff) Blake of Cadiz, and Ray (Beverly) Wood of Kilgore; 20 grandchildren, 41 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren. She served on the Deersville Village Council, Deersville Fire Department and was a member of the Chatterbox CB Club. Elaine loved gospel music and played guitar, mandolin and banjo. She had a deep faith in God and was involved in children’s ministry throughout her work with Apostolic churches. She was a wonderful cook, making homemade bread, buns, and jelly for her family and friends. She loved people, always greeting everyone with a hug. She fought for the right and always encouraged people to keep God on their side. Visitation will be held Monday, April 17 from 2-4 and 6-8 at Clark-Kirkland Funeral Home, Cadiz where funeral service will be held Tuesday at 11 a.m. with Robert Wood officiating. Burial will follow at Fairview Cemetery, Jewett with Pastor Tommy Miller officiating. Memorial contributions may be made to the charity of the donor’s choice. The memorial guestbook may be signed at www.clark-kirkland.com.

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Hoagland, Kennedy Speak At Lincoln Day Dinner

Hoagland, Kennedy Speak At Lincoln Day Dinner

(Top to bottom): Sharon Kennedy, Frank Hoagland, Andy Thompson, Mary DeGenaro. NEW ATHENS – Current presence and new were on center stage at last Thursday’s Annual Lincoln Day Dinner, held once again at New Athens’ Franklin Museum. Along with Representative, Andy Thompson (R-District 95) and Mary DeGenaro of Ohio’s 7th District Court of Appeals, the large crowd took up every seat on hand to hear retired military and newly elected Senator, Frank Hoagland (R-District 30) and Ohio Supreme Court Justice, Sharon Kennedy speak on the topics of today. Vice Chairman of the Harrison County Republican Party, Barry Momeyer introduced the guest speakers while throwing in a few zingers himself, which partisan rhetoric seemed to be slightly heavier than in past years. Momeyer, before introducing the night’s keynote speaker stated how much he enjoyed introducing Hoagland and, “no longer do we have Lou Gentile there now, we have our representative for our district here, right here right now.” And when introducing Kennedy he joked that she was the “only liberal sounding name we can vote for,” which drew a healthy laugh. Kennedy spoke first commenting on her new, shorter-hair look and contact lenses and joking that some in the crowd might not have recognized her. She thanked the audience for inviting her back again and remembering her. Kennedy began by touching on her beginnings in Harrison County, which she said was 2011 and where she began working on the Bench back in 1999. “And I came here because I could see the future,” she said confidently. “You’re standing in the midst of the future as I told you then.” She said that her branch of government (judicial) “represents” a limited voice within the government. She spoke of the Constitution and the unalienable rights written by the Founding Fathers in the Declaration of Independence. Kennedy spoke of the Federalist Paper No. 78, where it states that the judicial branch is the “least dangerous branch because we do not raise a standing army nor can we raise a tax.” But she contradicted that statement by stating that it could be dangerous. She spoke of a “magical pen” and how her branch of government could be dangerous if it did not show judicial restraint noting President Ronald Reagan’s emphasis on a branch of checks and balances minus liberal or conservative leanings. “And we believe, as President Reagan did that the men and women don a black robe have a limited role in our government to enforce the law as it’s written…” Kennedy explained. She also spoke of the turnover within the state’s highest court through election commending the public’s help in doing so and the changes that have followed. “But you’re only halfway through the change…,” she said, adding that three new justices by 2022 will need to be elected. “It’s up to you to decide what the role in the third branch of government should be.” Hoagland followed by thanking God as his first thought shared and thanking God for his wife and family and for living in “the United States of America,” which drew huge applause. He said his heroes were the other men and women who served in the armed forces and the importance of that service “but as soon as you take that uniform off it doesn’t mean you stop serving.” He then spoke of what an honor it was to be standing before the audience as their state senator. “It’s not about me, it’s not about Frank Hoagland,” he told the large crowd. “It’s about people like my father who fought in Vietnam, they’re my heroes. These men and women who served and crossed the sea on distant lands wrote that blank check saying they would be willing to die for our Constitution. Those are the men and women who are my heroes.” Hoagland acknowledged his peers, the ones he said stood on each side of him and noted that they were the ones who taught him how “important to be part of a team.” “Our motto is team, teammate, self,” he said while emphasizing self in that sentence. He also reminded the crowd that, “our freedom is not free” while speaking of the many men and women currently serving around the world guarding posts night and day. Hoagland said his ambition was to be a Navy Seal because he heard they were “the toughest.” He began the journey, though, with three broken toes on his left foot and said the doctor basically questioned his intelligence in wanting to do something like this. He then touched on his senate experience and what it was like working in Columbus. He said that after spending 29 years working for the government as a military man he spelled it out in plain English: “We never have enough time for what we need to get done. Every place I’m supposed to be at I need to be somewhere else.” He continued by stating his frustration when speaking to someone that there are a handful of others waiting in the wings and no matter how hard he tries he said he “can’t try hard enough.” He also touched on fighting the war on drugs beginning in the 1980s and the men lost while chasing Pablo Escobar, who was eventually hunted down and killed by Columbian Police and other military forces. He was reminded one time of the fact that as long as there were people in America willing to take drugs there was someone in another country willing to provide it. “We together have to figure out the solution,” Hoagland explained and ended his speech to a standing ovation.

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