Top Story

Two vehicle crash results in fatality

Two vehicle crash results in fatality

SCIO – On Feb. 20, at 4:05 p.m., Brian J. Williams, 60, of Dellroy, was traveling west bound on Ohio 151 in Harrison County, near Scio, operating a 2003 Harley Davidson motorcycle. The Harley Davidson traveled across the center line and into the path of an east bound 1997 Chevrolet S-10 being operated by Charles J. Harris, 56, of Scio. Brian J. Williams was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Harrison County Coroners Office. Charles J. Harris suffered minor injuries and was treated at the scene. The crash remains under investigation per the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

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Cadiz VFD Fish Fry Underway

Cadiz VFD Fish Fry Underway

CADIZ – The Cadiz Volunteer Fire Department has kicked off their annual Fish Fry, which began last Friday. The event will run through the time of Lent, said Fire Chief Leonard Merryman. The Fish Fry is being held each Friday in the back of the fire house at the side entrance. For orders, please call: (40) 942-3602.

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Sander’s Market closes in on March 1 target date for Cadiz opening

Sander’s Market closes in on March 1 target date for Cadiz opening

By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com New product is ready to go at the old Coffy’s Bi-Lo store. The place is crawling with workers upgrading pipes, freezers, walls and ceiling for the expected opening of Sander’s Market on March 1. CADIZ – Jake Sander, co-owner of Sander’s Market, which bought out Thorne’s via bankruptcy court late last year took a walk around his Cadiz store pointing out the new equipment to come soon. The Cadiz store is third in line for opening of the four he bought in Ohio, which he said is marked for March 1. So far the shelves are empty and workers are working around the ceiling, the walls and anywhere else one looks to get the store ready for the highly anticipated opening. Along those empty shelves, though, are long lines of newly delivered stock ready to be placed for eager locals who have gotten weary of traveling outside of town just to find some produce. “It’s amazing how fast things come together at the end,” Sander said referring to how much work is still to be completed. Some of the work includes replacing the long display case that still sits at the deli counter. It will be replaced with a new one, as well as the meat case to go along with an already replaced frozen food freezer and a 20 foot beer case to replace the old 16 footer. Some might be surprised that Sander had at one time worked for Thorne as a store manager in Warren, Pennsylvania. He said because of that relationship and keeping in touch over the years about the business, was how he knew about Thorne’s situation and the eventual bankruptcy filing. Sander said he’ll be working with local vendors for sure, as well as some of his past connections, which he said have been terrific in helping him set up and for supplying him with what he needs. Sander said the store when ready, will have experienced an 80 percent surge of refurbishing, which includes the roof. He’s had patchwork done but eventually knows a new roof will be needed in time. “You can’t do everything all at once,” he said. As for the product itself? Certified Angus beef, organic products, gluten free as well as prepared dinners, which he said have been popular at his other stores in western Pennsylvania. Some of those dinners for two are to include, pork chops (breaded or barbeque), ham, turkey, spaghetti and meatballs and meat loaf, for example. His store will also include promotions like “Midnight Madness,” which he said are held three times throughout the year on Memorial Day, 4th of July and Labor Day. He said the ultimate goal though, is customer service where they will aim to provide whatever the customer wants if he can get it.

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Committee recommends courthouse entrance change

Committee recommends courthouse entrance change

By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com CADIZ – The current courthouse entrance underneath the West Market Street steps was never set in stone. Wednesday, Common Pleas Judge T. Shawn Hervey appeared before the Harrison County Commissioners to announce the Courthouse Security Committee’s recommendation for a permanent entrance. Hervey stated that after last week’s committee meeting a vote of 8-3 turned out in favor of a new entrance for the courthouse to be the current state auditor’s office (or commissioner’s auxiliary office), which is just to the right of the South Main Street entrance. The door is already in place but a sign on the outside states that it is not an entrance to the courthouse. For that to happen workers would need to remove a section of wall that is situated at the back of that office, which would lead to a hallway just outside one of two commissioner’s interior entrances. From there, all the public would need to do is make two short left turns and they would be at the foot of the stairs leading inside the main area of the courthouse. “After a lot of debate the committee’s recommendation is that’s the best entrance for considering handicap access and the public,” Hervey explained, “as well as cosmetics coming into the courthouse, access to the elevator, cuts off access to a boiler room and making people walk past bathrooms on their way into the courthouse.” Hervey added that alongside the current entrance, two entrances would need to be closed if it remained the same, where one leads to the veteran’s office and the other is the second interior door leading into the commissioner’s office. Estimation for the project were just “ballpark” figures Hervey said but did not give out a number, to which commissioner, Paul Coffland interjected and stated that it would now be up to the commissioners to get a solid estimate. “We wanted to pick an entrance so that we could get detailed plans written…once those plans are made we can put it out to bid and see where we’re at…” Hervey explained. He continued by stating that a major part of the estimate dealt with architectural and engineering issues “and hopefully we can reduce those.” Coffland reminded everyone that they did offer all offices to submit their ideas for a permanent entrance as well, but said to date they had only received one. Hervey closed by noting that they have been working on this for the past eight to nine months and said, “it’s time.” Coffland later stated that the commissioners did not have to accept the recommendation and said the decision was ultimately up to them. No further action was taken at this time and the commissioners gave no indication of where they were leaning on this subject.

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Former McDonald’s AA And NBA Player Speaks To Cadiz Students

Former McDonald’s AA And NBA Player Speaks To Cadiz Students

(left to right): Juvenile Court Administrator, Paige Wood, Juvenile Probation Officer and Cadiz Council Member, Chace Smith, Chris Herren and Judge, Matthew Puskarich) By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com CADIZ – Among the glitter and pizazz of being a star, whether it be athletes or entertainers, there’s always a story behind their million dollar smiles just as there are behind the debt-ridden frowns of the poor, or be it middle class anonymity. Chris Herren was not only a McDonald’s All-American basketball prospect out of Durfee High School in Fall River, Massachusetts but he made it all the way to the NBA playing first, for the Denver Nuggets (2nd round draft pick) then his beloved Boston Celtics-a childhood dream of his. Herren was so good he turned down Duke and Kentucky to play for the local Boston College Eagles-he wanted to stay a local boy. He even made it into Rolling Stone and Sports Illustrated magazines as a feature. In fact he was so good his career at Boston College never survived the first year and his NBA career barely lasted two years. Herren was a junkie-the drug kind, that is. He failed several drug tests at Boston College before being kicked out then received a second chance and played out his amateur career at Fresno State, but he failed tests there too. Herren, 42, came to town Tuesday to speak to Harrison Hills students in the auditorium pacing back and forth, pausing at times to accentuate some of his major points. Herren has been clean for more than nine years now and speaks, he said about 250 times a year around the country trying to reach anyone and everyone who will listen to the man who once told himself, “I’ll never be like that” when sitting in a high school auditorium listening to the type of speaker he would later become. Herren had it all, or was building up to it but after the brief stint with the NBA and another handful of years playing in Europe he spent it all on dope, where he found himself collecting and stealing whatever he could to pay for his habit. It began with drinking and occasional drugs to Oxycontin and heroin. He even died for 30 seconds, which was part of his four overdoses. The story is the same you here from anyone whose been addicted to drugs but what Herren tries to emphasize is what causes these situations. He wants to reach out to young people who think it can’t happen to them. His father was and is an alcoholic where he decided to try one of his father’s Miller Lites. It was the same result he had when he told himself he would only try cocaine once when first walking into his dorm room at Boston College. The nightmare lasted 14 years. Herren’s tour is not as motivational speaker but raw and to the blunt edge, as he recalled one teenage girl listening to one of his talks who later emailed him and citing the same background situation he had growing up. “Dear Mr. Herren, I was the girl with her hand up,” she later emailed him after he tried to find her amongst the crowd after he finished speaking. “For the first time in my life I felt like I did something nice for them,” he recalled after hearing her story. Herren was impressed when after speaking, he asked the young audience if they had any questions and more than a handful took the time to raise their hand and share something very personal. It appeared he was hitting home with some of them and he commended them for having the guts to do so, considering the gauntlet of peer pressure teenagers experience. Herren said he prays before speaking that he can at least make a difference with just one person who is out there in the audience. The girl’s story he recalled was heartbreaking because of her dysfunctional home situation. “I’m going to be that one kid,” he said she told him because he had given her the confidence to speak up. And she did speak up to the ones who bullied her and that girl has kept in touch with Herren for seven years, every 30 days she sends him an email. “That little girl’s emails is one of the main reasons why I do this,” he told the Husky students,” and seven years ago I never heard of her.” Herren calls himself “unbelievablely blessed” to still be alive with a wife and three children to enjoy when asked how he deals with his children considering his past. He said he doesn’t accept “it.” He won’t ignore problems and won’t become like the parents he hears of, who are alcoholics and drug addicts and don’t involve themselves in their child’s lives. “I’m going to give them a hug and tell them I love them and I’m going to ask them one question,” he said referring to his own children and what could happen to them. “Please tell me why…after all I’ve put you through with my past…” He said, “we all have ‘why’ inside of us. “Parents don’t ask it because they don’t want to hear it,” he said, “and as kids we don’t want to talk about it so we pretend it’s not there.” Herren, for all his talents and success as an athlete he repeated that he’d always told himself that he was no good. He said out of 15 basketball teammates from high school, an astounding seven became heroin addicts. Herren told the crowd that he broke a promise he made to his mother once that he would not become like his father, an alcoholic. “It’s about you, not me,” he said of this day and his message. His goal for everyone listening on this day? “That one of you walk out of here today, sit at your desk and say to yourself, ‘I’m not even close to being the person I want to be.’” Herren told the students anyone can walk in here and show pictures of drug addicts or the horror of what drugs can do to a person’s life. “But there’s not enough people asking you why.”

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Area News

Two vehicle crash results in fatality

Two vehicle crash results in fatality

SCIO – On Feb. 20, at 4:05 p.m., Brian J. Williams, 60, of Dellroy, was traveling west bound on Ohio 151 in Harrison County, near Scio, operating a 2003 Harley Davidson motorcycle. The Harley Davidson traveled across the center line and into the path of an east bound 1997 Chevrolet S-10 being operated by Charles J. Harris, 56, of Scio. Brian J. Williams was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Harrison County Coroners Office. Charles J. Harris suffered minor injuries and was treated at the scene. The crash remains under investigation per the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

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Obituaries

Elden “Tex” Lee Doane

Elden “Tex” Lee Doane

 1943-2018 Elden “Tex” Lee Doane, age 74, of Tippecanoe, passed away on Thursday, Feb. 15,  at Community Hospice Truman House in New Philadelphia, following complications from diabetes. Elden was born on May 13, 1943 in Tippecanoe. He was the son of the late Walter and Anna (Tidrick) Doane. In addition to his parents, Elden is preceded in death by sisters Faye Terakedis, Marla Mahaffey and Alice Doane; brothers Bob, Ralph, Melvin and Wayne Doane. Elden graduated from Freeport High School and attended Kent State University. He enlisted in the United States Army. Elden retired from Gradall and Consolidated Coal as a welder. He was a member of the South Side Gospel Chapel; a member of the Color Guard for the Midvale VFW Post #9620 and past member of the Washington Township Fire Department. Elden was an avid fisherman, he loved to travel, go to auctions and play fast pitch softball. He was a foster parent, belonged to the Big Brother/Big Sister Program, the owner of Lakeland Supply Center and President of the Clos-e-nough Construction Company. On April 16, 1966, in the 11th Street Church of God, Elden married Ginger (Bair) Doane, who survives of the home. Also surviving are their daughters Beth (Kyle) Wood and Becky Doane, all of Tippecanoe; siblings Doris Crabtree, Kenny Doane, Ruth Edwards, Dean (Sharon) Doane, Karen Sue Walton, Stella (Dan) Gibson and Maxine; grandchildren Jeremiah, Elizabeth and Kathryn Wood all of Tippecanoe and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services for Elden will be held at 1 p.m., on Tuesday, Feb. 20, at the Uhrich-Hostettler English Funeral Home, Inc. at Uhrichsville, with the Pastor Leonard Porter officiating. Burial will follow at Mt. Carmel Cemetery where the Midvale VFW Post #9620 will conduct military graveside services. Calling hours will be from 2 to 8 p.m., on Monday, Feb. 19, at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to Community Hospice of Tuscarawas County, 716 Commercial Ave., SW, New Philadelphia, O., 44663.

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Podcast

Hey Now, Harrison County Episode 10

Hey Now, Harrison County Episode 10

We’re back with another episode of HNHC where we sit down and talk with Dr. Robert Stevens who is retiring from his chiropractic practice he’s worked since 1964. agent = navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase(); name_ff = "firefox"; name_op = "opera"; if (agent.indexOf(name_ff.toLowerCase())>-1 || agent.indexOf(name_op.toLowerCase())>-1) { pbwp_audio = document.getElementById('audioplayer-44f0932d9e19b69243d958902f0bf654'); pbwp_audio.style.display = "none"; pbwp_audio_fallback = document.createElement('embed'); pbwp_audio_fallback.setAttribute('type', 'application/x-shockwave-flash'); pbwp_audio_fallback.setAttribute('flashvars', 'audioUrl=http://www.harrisonnewsherald.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/HNHC-Episode-10.mp3'); pbwp_audio_fallback.setAttribute('src', 'http://www.harrisonnewsherald.com/wp-content/plugins/pb-oembed-html5-audio-with-cache-support/3523697345-audio-player.swf'); pbwp_audio_fallback.setAttribute('width', '400'); pbwp_audio_fallback.setAttribute('height', '27'); pbwp_audio_fallback.setAttribute('quality', 'best'); pbwp_audio.parentNode.insertBefore(pbwp_audio_fallback, pbwp_audio.nextSibling); }

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Recent Stories

 
Two vehicle crash results in fatality

Two vehicle crash results in fatality

SCIO – On Feb. 20, at 4:05 p.m., Brian J. Williams, 60, of Dellroy, was traveling west bound on Ohio 151 in Harrison County, near Scio, operating a 2003 Harley Davidson motorcycle. The Harley Davidson traveled across the center line and into the path of an east bound 1997 Chevrolet S-10 being operated by Charles J. Harris, 56, of Scio. Brian J. Williams was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Harrison County Coroners Office. Charles J. Harris suffered minor injuries and was treated at the scene. The crash remains under investigation per the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

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Cadiz VFD Fish Fry Underway

Cadiz VFD Fish Fry Underway

CADIZ – The Cadiz Volunteer Fire Department has kicked off their annual Fish Fry, which began last Friday. The event will run through the time of Lent, said Fire Chief Leonard Merryman. The Fish Fry is being held each Friday in the back of the fire house at the side entrance. For orders, please call: (40) 942-3602.

Read Full Story »

Sander’s Market closes in on March 1 target date for Cadiz opening

Sander’s Market closes in on March 1 target date for Cadiz opening

By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com New product is ready to go at the old Coffy’s Bi-Lo store. The place is crawling with workers upgrading pipes, freezers, walls and ceiling for the expected opening of Sander’s Market on March 1. CADIZ – Jake Sander, co-owner of Sander’s Market, which bought out Thorne’s via bankruptcy court late last year took a walk around his Cadiz store pointing out the new equipment to come soon. The Cadiz store is third in line for opening of the four he bought in Ohio, which he said is marked for March 1. So far the shelves are empty and workers are working around the ceiling, the walls and anywhere else one looks to get the store ready for the highly anticipated opening. Along those empty shelves, though, are long lines of newly delivered stock ready to be placed for eager locals who have gotten weary of traveling outside of town just to find some produce. “It’s amazing how fast things come together at the end,” Sander said referring to how much work is still to be completed. Some of the work includes replacing the long display case that still sits at the deli counter. It will be replaced with a new one, as well as the meat case to go along with an already replaced frozen food freezer and a 20 foot beer case to replace the old 16 footer. Some might be surprised that Sander had at one time worked for Thorne as a store manager in Warren, Pennsylvania. He said because of that relationship and keeping in touch over the years about the business, was how he knew about Thorne’s situation and the eventual bankruptcy filing. Sander said he’ll be working with local vendors for sure, as well as some of his past connections, which he said have been terrific in helping him set up and for supplying him with what he needs. Sander said the store when ready, will have experienced an 80 percent surge of refurbishing, which includes the roof. He’s had patchwork done but eventually knows a new roof will be needed in time. “You can’t do everything all at once,” he said. As for the product itself? Certified Angus beef, organic products, gluten free as well as prepared dinners, which he said have been popular at his other stores in western Pennsylvania. Some of those dinners for two are to include, pork chops (breaded or barbeque), ham, turkey, spaghetti and meatballs and meat loaf, for example. His store will also include promotions like “Midnight Madness,” which he said are held three times throughout the year on Memorial Day, 4th of July and Labor Day. He said the ultimate goal though, is customer service where they will aim to provide whatever the customer wants if he can get it.

Read Full Story »

Committee recommends courthouse entrance change

Committee recommends courthouse entrance change

By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com CADIZ – The current courthouse entrance underneath the West Market Street steps was never set in stone. Wednesday, Common Pleas Judge T. Shawn Hervey appeared before the Harrison County Commissioners to announce the Courthouse Security Committee’s recommendation for a permanent entrance. Hervey stated that after last week’s committee meeting a vote of 8-3 turned out in favor of a new entrance for the courthouse to be the current state auditor’s office (or commissioner’s auxiliary office), which is just to the right of the South Main Street entrance. The door is already in place but a sign on the outside states that it is not an entrance to the courthouse. For that to happen workers would need to remove a section of wall that is situated at the back of that office, which would lead to a hallway just outside one of two commissioner’s interior entrances. From there, all the public would need to do is make two short left turns and they would be at the foot of the stairs leading inside the main area of the courthouse. “After a lot of debate the committee’s recommendation is that’s the best entrance for considering handicap access and the public,” Hervey explained, “as well as cosmetics coming into the courthouse, access to the elevator, cuts off access to a boiler room and making people walk past bathrooms on their way into the courthouse.” Hervey added that alongside the current entrance, two entrances would need to be closed if it remained the same, where one leads to the veteran’s office and the other is the second interior door leading into the commissioner’s office. Estimation for the project were just “ballpark” figures Hervey said but did not give out a number, to which commissioner, Paul Coffland interjected and stated that it would now be up to the commissioners to get a solid estimate. “We wanted to pick an entrance so that we could get detailed plans written…once those plans are made we can put it out to bid and see where we’re at…” Hervey explained. He continued by stating that a major part of the estimate dealt with architectural and engineering issues “and hopefully we can reduce those.” Coffland reminded everyone that they did offer all offices to submit their ideas for a permanent entrance as well, but said to date they had only received one. Hervey closed by noting that they have been working on this for the past eight to nine months and said, “it’s time.” Coffland later stated that the commissioners did not have to accept the recommendation and said the decision was ultimately up to them. No further action was taken at this time and the commissioners gave no indication of where they were leaning on this subject.

Read Full Story »

Elden “Tex” Lee Doane

Elden “Tex” Lee Doane

 1943-2018 Elden “Tex” Lee Doane, age 74, of Tippecanoe, passed away on Thursday, Feb. 15,  at Community Hospice Truman House in New Philadelphia, following complications from diabetes. Elden was born on May 13, 1943 in Tippecanoe. He was the son of the late Walter and Anna (Tidrick) Doane. In addition to his parents, Elden is preceded in death by sisters Faye Terakedis, Marla Mahaffey and Alice Doane; brothers Bob, Ralph, Melvin and Wayne Doane. Elden graduated from Freeport High School and attended Kent State University. He enlisted in the United States Army. Elden retired from Gradall and Consolidated Coal as a welder. He was a member of the South Side Gospel Chapel; a member of the Color Guard for the Midvale VFW Post #9620 and past member of the Washington Township Fire Department. Elden was an avid fisherman, he loved to travel, go to auctions and play fast pitch softball. He was a foster parent, belonged to the Big Brother/Big Sister Program, the owner of Lakeland Supply Center and President of the Clos-e-nough Construction Company. On April 16, 1966, in the 11th Street Church of God, Elden married Ginger (Bair) Doane, who survives of the home. Also surviving are their daughters Beth (Kyle) Wood and Becky Doane, all of Tippecanoe; siblings Doris Crabtree, Kenny Doane, Ruth Edwards, Dean (Sharon) Doane, Karen Sue Walton, Stella (Dan) Gibson and Maxine; grandchildren Jeremiah, Elizabeth and Kathryn Wood all of Tippecanoe and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services for Elden will be held at 1 p.m., on Tuesday, Feb. 20, at the Uhrich-Hostettler English Funeral Home, Inc. at Uhrichsville, with the Pastor Leonard Porter officiating. Burial will follow at Mt. Carmel Cemetery where the Midvale VFW Post #9620 will conduct military graveside services. Calling hours will be from 2 to 8 p.m., on Monday, Feb. 19, at the funeral home. Memorial contributions may be made to Community Hospice of Tuscarawas County, 716 Commercial Ave., SW, New Philadelphia, O., 44663.

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Former McDonald’s AA And NBA Player Speaks To Cadiz Students

Former McDonald’s AA And NBA Player Speaks To Cadiz Students

(left to right): Juvenile Court Administrator, Paige Wood, Juvenile Probation Officer and Cadiz Council Member, Chace Smith, Chris Herren and Judge, Matthew Puskarich) By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com CADIZ – Among the glitter and pizazz of being a star, whether it be athletes or entertainers, there’s always a story behind their million dollar smiles just as there are behind the debt-ridden frowns of the poor, or be it middle class anonymity. Chris Herren was not only a McDonald’s All-American basketball prospect out of Durfee High School in Fall River, Massachusetts but he made it all the way to the NBA playing first, for the Denver Nuggets (2nd round draft pick) then his beloved Boston Celtics-a childhood dream of his. Herren was so good he turned down Duke and Kentucky to play for the local Boston College Eagles-he wanted to stay a local boy. He even made it into Rolling Stone and Sports Illustrated magazines as a feature. In fact he was so good his career at Boston College never survived the first year and his NBA career barely lasted two years. Herren was a junkie-the drug kind, that is. He failed several drug tests at Boston College before being kicked out then received a second chance and played out his amateur career at Fresno State, but he failed tests there too. Herren, 42, came to town Tuesday to speak to Harrison Hills students in the auditorium pacing back and forth, pausing at times to accentuate some of his major points. Herren has been clean for more than nine years now and speaks, he said about 250 times a year around the country trying to reach anyone and everyone who will listen to the man who once told himself, “I’ll never be like that” when sitting in a high school auditorium listening to the type of speaker he would later become. Herren had it all, or was building up to it but after the brief stint with the NBA and another handful of years playing in Europe he spent it all on dope, where he found himself collecting and stealing whatever he could to pay for his habit. It began with drinking and occasional drugs to Oxycontin and heroin. He even died for 30 seconds, which was part of his four overdoses. The story is the same you here from anyone whose been addicted to drugs but what Herren tries to emphasize is what causes these situations. He wants to reach out to young people who think it can’t happen to them. His father was and is an alcoholic where he decided to try one of his father’s Miller Lites. It was the same result he had when he told himself he would only try cocaine once when first walking into his dorm room at Boston College. The nightmare lasted 14 years. Herren’s tour is not as motivational speaker but raw and to the blunt edge, as he recalled one teenage girl listening to one of his talks who later emailed him and citing the same background situation he had growing up. “Dear Mr. Herren, I was the girl with her hand up,” she later emailed him after he tried to find her amongst the crowd after he finished speaking. “For the first time in my life I felt like I did something nice for them,” he recalled after hearing her story. Herren was impressed when after speaking, he asked the young audience if they had any questions and more than a handful took the time to raise their hand and share something very personal. It appeared he was hitting home with some of them and he commended them for having the guts to do so, considering the gauntlet of peer pressure teenagers experience. Herren said he prays before speaking that he can at least make a difference with just one person who is out there in the audience. The girl’s story he recalled was heartbreaking because of her dysfunctional home situation. “I’m going to be that one kid,” he said she told him because he had given her the confidence to speak up. And she did speak up to the ones who bullied her and that girl has kept in touch with Herren for seven years, every 30 days she sends him an email. “That little girl’s emails is one of the main reasons why I do this,” he told the Husky students,” and seven years ago I never heard of her.” Herren calls himself “unbelievablely blessed” to still be alive with a wife and three children to enjoy when asked how he deals with his children considering his past. He said he doesn’t accept “it.” He won’t ignore problems and won’t become like the parents he hears of, who are alcoholics and drug addicts and don’t involve themselves in their child’s lives. “I’m going to give them a hug and tell them I love them and I’m going to ask them one question,” he said referring to his own children and what could happen to them. “Please tell me why…after all I’ve put you through with my past…” He said, “we all have ‘why’ inside of us. “Parents don’t ask it because they don’t want to hear it,” he said, “and as kids we don’t want to talk about it so we pretend it’s not there.” Herren, for all his talents and success as an athlete he repeated that he’d always told himself that he was no good. He said out of 15 basketball teammates from high school, an astounding seven became heroin addicts. Herren told the crowd that he broke a promise he made to his mother once that he would not become like his father, an alcoholic. “It’s about you, not me,” he said of this day and his message. His goal for everyone listening on this day? “That one of you walk out of here today, sit at your desk and say to yourself, ‘I’m not even close to being the person I want to be.’” Herren told the students anyone can walk in here and show pictures of drug addicts or the horror of what drugs can do to a person’s life. “But there’s not enough people asking you why.”

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Scio Resident Speaks Out Against UEO Proposal

Scio Resident Speaks Out Against UEO Proposal

By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com SCIO – Last month the village of Scio approved a 10-year agreement with UEO Midstream for $1.15 million. The official contract has not yet been signed as it waits Scio private attorney, Eric J. Williams. There is also no timeline for signing that contract (Williams did not respond to a voice message). While that process waits to be played out some are stewing over what they feel as a giant “screwing” that the village is getting. Many feel that Scio should be receiving much more for all the traffic and profits UEO is producing from that plant, such as the product being transported by rail car. Local resident, Tom Spiker was one of those people who appeared before council at Wednesday evening’s council meeting. Spiker was tactful but adamant that Scio was getting the short end of the stick on this deal and cited the city of Green and the deal they just received, which is just north of Canton. Green also found themselves in the crosshairs of an oil and gas business, Nexus Gas Transmission, who wished to run a 36-inch pipeline through their community-a pipeline that the city did not want. Just earlier this month, though, and after much haranguing in the court system, which Scio has avoided, Green found themselves on the receiving end of a $7 million check. And that was after Nexus won a judgment in the name of eminent domain. Communication’s Manager for the city of Green, Valerie Wolford speculated that even though, Nexus had the upper hand, they wanted to get the job done and avoid a longer court battle. She said some within her community were surprised at the amount while others, she said, even thought that amount was low. Wolford said the 2.5 acres in question could have resulted in amounts as low as $17,000 to $100,000 if they had not reached the deal, which won by a surprisingly narrow vote of 4-3. But that is pipeline and not railroads and processing plants. Spiker, after speaking with a friend in the railroad business, but who no longer works on the Genesee & Wyoming Railroad (G&W) that UEO uses, through out numbers of rail cars passing per day, money that could be charged per car adding to a weekly fee and when finished on that line of thought, the fee reached $50 million the village could be bringing in as the result of the UEO plant. Spiker also volunteered his services in helping to secure a $120,000 loan it would take “to incorporate the plant,” as he referred to either a Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) or actual annexation, which the village considered both at one time. “I think I can secure that loan for you, not from me but I have sources that I could secure so it wouldn’t cost you anything,” Spiker told council, “and of course it could be repaid back.” “This is like a golden opportunity,” he continued. “Because if you sign that contract with them you’ve got 10 years…you’re going to get $115,000 and nothing else,” he said referring to the annual payment to the village. The railroad worker Spiker was referring to was Tom Umpleby, who is now a railroad consultant. Umpleby was involved in transporting one of the more expensive pieces of equipment from Houston, Tx. ($60 million estimate) that was transported to Scio as part of the UEO plant when it was being built. Umpleby was even more expressive in his thoughts towards Scio’s situation stating how he could not understand Scio not receiving more out of the UEO deal. “They (UEO) are using the resources of that community and they’re getting off scot-free,” Umpleby said, who also has family in Scio. He too cited the Green situation and what they received from Nexus. “That’s just to build a pipeline through their community, we’re talking about permanent infrastructure,” he said referring to the $7 million the city of Green received versus UEO “taxing” Scio’s water system and other parts of the infrastructure. “I just can’t understand why somebody in that township didn’t think to get some legal advice as to what they could demand…they’re justified in making a demand for,” Umpleby said referring to when the plant was first built roughly five years ago. “It just seems to me that here’s some big, big boys from Texas come in and they, you know, they come in and they say we’re just going to just run this right through these hill jacks and they’re not even going to know what hit them,” Umpleby said bluntly. He added that he was not against fracking but feels these large companies that use the local resources should be paying their fair share. He also added that UEO is generating “a lot of revenue” out of the G&W rail lines and said out of that finished product being shipped via those lines, “there should be some kind of tax on that they could enact.” Council thanked Spiker for his time and effort but had no official comment regarding his suggestions but some did express interest in speaking with Umpleby. Also, the village is still looking for one council seat to fill, as well as accepting applications for a part time employee and a meter reader. A letter of interest can be left in the door or with the clerk of the village.

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Cheryl Jean Tipton

Cheryl Jean Tipton

Cheryl Jean Tipton, 66, of Hopedale, Ohio, died in Weirton Medical Center, Weirton, W.Va. Tues. Feb. 13, 2018.  She was born in Steubenville, Ohio, Oct. 1, 1951, daughter of the late Harry and Phyllis Daugherty Tipton. Cheryl was a 1969 graduate of Hopedale High School and a member of the Unionport United Methodist Church. She had worked at Scio Pottery for 16 years and later as an employee of Coffy’s in Cadiz and Riesbecks of Wintersville. Surviving is one brother, Fred A. Tipton of Hopedale and three sisters, Judith L. Green of Jewett, Betty Lou Tipton of Hopedale and Lois Faunda and husband James of Tuscaloosa, Alabama.  Also surviving are nine loving nieces and nephews and eight great nieces and nephews. Friends may call on Thurs. Feb. 15, 2018 from 5 to 8 pm at Blackburn Funeral Home Hopedale, Ohio. Services will be there on Fri. Feb. 16 at 11 a.m., with Pastor Deborah Kellar. Burial will follow in Greenwood Cemetery. Contributions may be made to the Unionport United Methodist Church, 64 West St., Bloomingdale, Ohio  43910. Blackburn Funeral Home – 740-937-2461 , www.blackburnfuneralhomes.com

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Helen Louise Menkel

Helen Louise Menkel

Helen Louise Menkel, age 97, of Yorba Linda, Calif.,, formerly of Palos Verdes,Calif., and originally from Scio, Ohio passed away peacefully in her sleep on Tuesday, Jan. 23. Born Oct. 30, 1920 in Scio, she was the youngest daughter of Elmer and Mae Menkel.  Helen graduated from Scio High School in 1938 and then Ohio State in 1944   with a degree in Education.  She was the beloved sister of Mary Menkel (Arter) and Louis Menkel.  Helen was a member of the Presbyterian Church since 1932 and was until her death. At the time of her passing Helen was the oldest living member of the congregation. She is survived by her nephews Bill Arter and Louis Menkel, her nieces Beth (Arter) Bodkin  and Cindy Brown and many great nieces, and nephews, and even great great great nieces and nephews. Also a second cousin, Linda Lee Laughlin of Scio. Helen settled in California and had a long career in the Aerospace Industry. She lived by the ocean and also had a cabin in the mountains. She loved to travel, was a skilled tournament bridge player, played tennis, and loved genealogy.  Once retired, she conducted tours at the local courthouse for visiting school children, and traveled extensively. Later in life Helen sufferered from Alzheimer’s but remained a very happy positive person throughout. She was much loved by all her friends and the care givers at her home because of her intelligence and sense of humor. A memorial service is being planned in the spring. Koch Funeral has been entrusted with her arrangements.

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HCH Seeks Coalition Partnership

HCH Seeks Coalition Partnership

(left: John Sebring) By JD LONG jim@harrisonnewsherald.com CADIZ – Last Friday, numerous departments including Emergency Management Agency (EMA), the Harrison Community Hospital (HCH) and several nursing home centers met to discuss forming a partnership to deal with emergencies. John Sebring, corporate director for safety security emergency management for Wheeling Hospital and HCH, led off the meeting by stating that he has been working with EMA Director, Eric Wilson to help build their emergency management program, with the intent of working beyond HCH’s boundaries. “We cannot be successful here at our emergency management or disaster planning…” Sebring explained, “unless we do a couple things.” He talked of extending themselves to work alongside public safety. The second point he brought up was to reach out to other entities such as Sunnyslope of Bowerston, Gables Care Center in Hopedale, the County Home and Res Care and the Carriage Inn of Cadiz who were all represented at the meeting. The purpose he said was for drilling in exercises to prepare for potential disasters, which could involve moving patients from one facility to another. “We cannot be successful unless we have coalition partners,” Sebring told them. “So we all have to work together not just in evacuation and transporting and receiving patients…,” he said in regards to working alongside the various agencies. Sebring made it a point to state they weren’t trying to recreate the wheel but to plan and exercise in the same manner they have been doing with other hospitals in the Ohio Valley. “Our goal is at Harrison Community Hospital is to service our county and our commission, we’re going to be as prepared as we can be. We’re going to use the resources of not only in this county but all of our hospitals surrounding us and the counties around us and Harrison County is an important part of what we want to do here,” Sebring explained. He stated that as coalition partners they now had the responsibility of checking supplies and drill and evacuation procedures. He also emphasized that everyone’s disaster plans match in case of the need to transport patients to various facilities. Sebring said after working at HCH since last year he discovered that, even though everyone was working hard and doing a good job he felt they were alone, which led to his staff working with Wilson on a plan. Sebring noted three ways in which he would like to partner with the area’s agencies. One was emergency planning where they would work together in a “time of crisis.” A second way was training and exercise and a third way would be to coordinate with EMA. Wilson then spoke touching on the overview of procedures he handed out to the group, which dealt with what was required of hospitals and assisted living facilities, he said. He spoke about an ambition to help each group to understand the terms in order to “gain compliance.” Some of the requirements not only dealt with tabletop exercises but also actual physical drills among the different agencies and facilities. Wilson also talked of being the “conduit” for the various groups during an emergency to aid in their needs in case something was required. “Whatever you can think of, I’ve got access to the resources,” Wilson told them. “I can go to the state level and we’ve also got agreements in place where I can go to Pennsylvania, I can go to West Virginia, I can go almost anywhere I need to go to help make things happen.” Sebring also gave everyone a chance to express their needs, which began with Gables representatives Kevin Case and Dwaine Zink who stated they already have agreements in place with several hospitals for transporting patients in case of emergency. Tabletop exercises kept surfacing among the rhetoric for throwing ideas around and preparedness. Wilson said communication was one of the overlooked items they come across and mentioned the beginning of the process when dealing with an emergency. “How do we start the process?” he asked and noted the mass casualty plan they have been working on since the large exercise the EMA and various agencies conducted last summer, which originated at the MarkWest plant in Cadiz. “We need to coordinate communication,” he said referring to how many patients would be transported to each of the area hospitals. Wilson asked who should he contacted in an emergency. Who does he get out of bed in the middle of the night? Sebring talked about ambulances and asked where are you going to get them at a moment’s notice compared to a larger city in a more populated area. “That’s real life in rural America and so you’re not any different than anybody else,” Sebring told the group. Everyone agreed to meet again in early March to exchange more ideas.

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