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Rose M. Lester

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Rose M. Lester of Ronceverte, W. Va., formerly of Jewett, passed away Sunday, February 21, 2010 at Greenbrier Valley Medical Center. Born December 24, 1928 in Jewett, she was the daughter of the late Samuel and Mary Hauber Richards.

Public viewing will be held noon-2 p.m. Thursday, February 25, 2010 at Clark-Kirkland Funeral Home, Cadiz, Ohio. A graveside service will be held 2 p.m. Thursday at Greenwood Cemetery, Hopedale, Ohio with the Rev. Youel Altizer officiating.

A full obituary will appear in the next edition of the Harrison-News Herald.

Florence L. Ford

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Florence L. Ford, 87, formerly of Madison Valley, died Feb. 19, 2010 at Victorian Oaks Care Center. She was born near Londonderry at the top of King Hill, April 1, 1922, to the late James Ross King and Laura S. Decker King. She was preceded in death by her husband William B. Ford in 2001, her parents, an infant son, her daughter, Betty Jean Alloway, her grandson, Jonathan Ford, her brother, Vernon (Lorna) King, her sister, Mary and her daughter-in-law, Sandra K. Ford. Public viewing will be held 2-6 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 21, 2010. Services will be 11 a.m. Monday, Feb. 22 at Bond Funeral Home, Londonderry, with Pastor Bob Merritt officiating. Burial will follow in Antrim Community Cemetery.
A full obituary will appear in the Feb. 27 edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Charles “Bob” Robert Barker

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Charles “Bob” Robert Barker died Friday, February 12, 2010 in Avon Park, Fla. He was born in Cadiz to Charles Lemuel and Stella Belle (Carson) Barker. Burial in Sarasota National Cemetery.
A full obituary will appear in the Free. 27 edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Declaration’s decline dismays officials

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By AMY GAREIS
News-Herald Staff Writer

CADIZ – One week after Harrison County declared a state of emergency in response to winter storms, word has come that it was not accepted on the federal level. That decision now has the local EMA director fuming.
County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management/911 Director Lorna Bower is livid over FEMA’s choice to not grant the declaration, which would provide assistance for the already financially strapped area and help them recoup some funds for cleanup efforts. Bower said she was notified by e-mail on Wednesday, but she is not backing down.
“They changed criteria on the snow policy,” she said. “We do not qualify for the declaration. I think it’s terrible. I think that more and more big government is trying to squeeze out little government. I think we should take care of the people in our country before we send resources overseas. I think we’ve got our priorities mixed up. People have tried so hard to take care of themselves and [government] has just rewritten things.”
Bower had approached commissioners on Feb. 9 to begin the process, but only after she and other EMA directors were contacted by Ohio Sen. Jason Wilson (D-Columbiana) to help reimburse areas within his jurisdiction for overtime cleanup during the storms starting Feb. 5. The area was bombarded by two separate storms that dumped a total of 16-21 inches of snow, while the first squall left thousands in the region without power for days and had residents and crews busily plowing driveways, roadways and byways throughout the week. It also forced a series of school delays, early dismissals and cancellations throughout the Ohio Valley.

Look for the complete story about the county’s state of emergency declaration in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Officials meet to discuss EPA suit

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By AMY GAREIS
News-Herald Staff Writer
CADIZ – County and village officials were meeting with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency for talks regarding a $40,000 fine for non-compliance.
Cadiz Water/Wastewater Superintendent Tom Carter told village Board of Public Affairs members Tuesday that a meeting was set to discuss the OEPA’s administrative suit and the potential fine Cadiz faces for not complying with sewer issues. Harrison County Engineer Rob Sterling was expected to participate and discuss the proposed alternative facility that would convert wastewater algae into biodiesel. The plan intends to divert wastewater from two-thirds of Cadiz’s sewer lines and help alleviate stress on the antiquated system.
“The village and county is meeting in Logan on the 18th to go over the project,” Carter said, later telling the News-Herald the purpose was to put leaders on the same page.
Under the administrative suit, the EPA could set a schedule and the village must either negotiate and/or comply with the order. Currently, the fine was given at $40,000 but officials hoped to eliminate the civil penalty completely. A Jan. 22 date had been set for Cadiz to respond, but a series of conflicts occurred and Village Solicitor Costa Mastros received an extension.
Last year, the board shelved plans to hire an engineer for the estimated multimillion-dollar overhaul until they received a timeline to upgrade the aging system. The ongoing sewer project would involve updating decades-old trunklines and making other improvements to cease overflow problems at the sewer treatment plant. However, Sterling proposed to reduce problems by diverting most of the wastewater at the south and central trunklines to a new $6 million facility and convert the algae into biodiesel. The village and county entered into the joint venture, which is expected to fuel county government vehicles and be sold on an open market.
There had been a glitch over the land ownership since the proposed plant was eyed at former Consolidation Coal Co. property, causing county commissioners to reject bids for materials for construction because Sterling said the matter held up the selection and ultimately would impact costs. The project required possession of the property and a portion of it was still under a reclamation bond, but the state was assisting with a resolution. Commissioners opted to rebid after it was settled.
Meanwhile, BPA member Dwight Cunningham suggested that Carter ask about stimulus funds that could possibly be used for the project.
In other business, the BPA:
* Approved raising the hourly rate of David Barr, chief operator (certified), to $12.61 and Roy Moore, meter reader/plant operator, to $11.93 to meet EPA compliance retroactive to Jan. 18;
* Discussed the status of the Jamison Avenue Waterline project. Carter said most of the $240,000 cost was obtained through grants and the remainder was being paid through a Cadiz Community Improvement Corp. loan;
* Discussed a proposal from Demand Response Partners (DRP) Energy Monitoring System of Williamsville, N.Y., to help gage energy savings by utilizing generators during peak electric hours. Officials said it could cut costs, but the Feb. 28 deadline to sign up was not enough time to decide and they opted to review it for next year.
Look for the latest news coverage of the meeting between village officials and the Ohio EPA in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Sterling helps rebuild hope in New Orleans

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By AMY GAREIS
News-Herald Staff Writer
CADIZ – Rob Sterling is helping New Orleans recover from Hurricane Katrina, one house at a time.
For the past four years, the Harrison County Engineer has traveled with members of Emmanuel Lutheran Church in New Philadelphia to rebuild houses devastated during the fierce storm in 2005 that breached the levee at Lake Pontchartrain and left 80 percent of the city underwater.
The New Philadelphia church partnered with Grace Lutheran Church in New Orleans for the project, while other churches from Bolivar and Newcomerstown also participated.
Most recently, he spent three days in early February assisting Habitat For Humanity, which has reconstructed or constructed nearly 400 homes in New Orleans, although 22,000 were damaged by the hurricane. He said the homeowners themselves were required to pitch in and give 300 hours of service with the organization, including 100 hours or more on what would become their own residence.
He said the church group had aided roughly three-dozen projects in the past, most of which were restoring homes. This was the first year he built new ones under Habitat For Humanity’s umbrella.
He added that it gave him some satisfaction to make a difference, even though it was more of a working vacation. He also noticed a difference from 2006 to the present– a sense of optimism amid the devastation.
Look for the full story of Sterling’s service project and additional photos in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Helen Manbeck Johnson

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Rev. Mrs. Helen Manbeck Johnson, died Feb. 11, 2010. She was born to the late Mary Rachel Harriman and Emerson C. Manbeck and celebrated her 87th birthday with family the previous day.
Public viewing will be held 12-2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, 2010 at Koch Funeral Home, Scio. Due to the weather there will be no public graveside service, however on Saturday of Memorial Day weekend, a memorial service with liberal sharing of “Ouisie” stories, songs and scripture will held with a luncheon following. Venue will be announced at a later date.
A full obituary will appear in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Frank Edward Zeroski

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Frank Edward Zeroski, 84, Adena, died Feb. 12, 2010 at Wheeling Hospital surrounded by his family. He was born Jan. 1, 1926, to Albert and Margaret (Waligura) Zeroski of Ramsey. Burial in Holly Memorial Gardens, Pleasant Grove.
A full obituary will appear in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Helen L. Pugh

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Helen L. Pugh, 102, died Monday, Feb. 15, 2010 at Wesleyan Village in Elyria. She was preceded in death by her husband, Eugene Pugh in 1978, her son Donald Pugh in 1988 and her daughter-law, Joyce Pugh, in 1999.
Funeral service will be held Thursday, Feb. 18, 2010 at Koch Funeral Home, Scio with the Rev. Karen Heyburn officiating.
A full obituary will appear in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

LEAD program graduates first class

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ST. CLAIRSVILLE – A new and innovative local leadership development program for agricultural and natural resources professionals recently graduated its first class of participants. In December, fifteen individuals from Carroll, Harrison, Jefferson, and Tuscarawas Counties graduated from the 14-month LEAD program at a graduation ceremony held at Dutch Valley Restaurant in Sugarcreek.
LEAD is an acronym for Leadership Education And Development. The program was developed by Ohio State University Extension and Ohio Farm Bureau in the four county areas, with a goal of increasing the pool of residents trained in leadership development. Crossroads RC&D provided fund-raising and project management support for the program. Local Farm Bureaus, businesses, and foundations provided financial support for the program.
“The goal of this program is to help local residents develop the skills needed to be successful in all types of leadership positions in their community, from PTO leaders and 4-H club advisors to county commissioners and school board members,” said Mike Hogan, OSU Extension Educator. “We were particularly interested in helping residents with agricultural backgrounds develop the skills necessary to move into local leadership positions,” added Hogan.
The program consisted of six different one and two day institutes, a state government study tour in Columbus and a federal government study tour in Washington DC. Participants developed skills such as public speaking, news writing, interpersonal communication, delegation, human resource management, time management, coaching, goal-setting, working with different generations and ages, and many more.
Additionally, participants learned about many current societal issues including land use planning, hunger and homelessness, ethnic and religious diversity, public policy development, immigration, trade, food security, federal farm policy, natural resource protection, sustainability, economic development, the global financial crisis, local food systems, infrastructure development, and others.
Participants also had the opportunity to meet with and learn from leaders such as US Sen. Sherrod Brown; US Reps. Zack Space and Charlie Wilson; Ohio Reps. Mark Okey and John Domenick; Ohio State Senator Jason Wilson; Ohio Farm Bureau Federation Executive Vice President Jack Fisher; OSU Extension Director Dr. Keith Smith; and many more. Participants also “shadowed” local elected leaders for a day in order to learn about their jobs and challenges. The group even learned leadership lessons from Ohio State University football coach Jim Tressel and got a behind the scenes tour of Ohio Stadium.
LEAD graduates from Harrison County include Don Jones of Freeport and Mike Hauber of Jewett.
OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status.
OSU Extension will provide accommodations to handicapped persons needing assistance to participate in Extension programs. If you require some type of assistance/accommodations to attend programs, utilize written materials, or visit the Harrison County Extension Office, please contact the Harrison Extension Office at 740-942-8823 or TTD # 1-800-589-8292.

LEAD program graduates first class
ST. CLAIRSVILLE – A new and innovative local leadership development program for agricultural and natural resources professionals recently graduated its first class of participants. In December, fifteen individuals from Carroll, Harrison, Jefferson, and Tuscarawas Counties graduated from the 14-month LEAD program at a graduation ceremony held at Dutch Valley Restaurant in Sugarcreek.LEAD is an acronym for Leadership Education And Development. The program was developed by Ohio State University Extension and Ohio Farm Bureau in the four county areas, with a goal of increasing the pool of residents trained in leadership development. Crossroads RC&D provided fund-raising and project management support for the program. Local Farm Bureaus, businesses, and foundations provided financial support for the program.“The goal of this program is to help local residents develop the skills needed to be successful in all types of leadership positions in their community, from PTO leaders and 4-H club advisors to county commissioners and school board members,” said Mike Hogan, OSU Extension Educator. “We were particularly interested in helping residents with agricultural backgrounds develop the skills necessary to move into local leadership positions,” added Hogan. The program consisted of six different one and two day institutes, a state government study tour in Columbus and a federal government study tour in Washington DC. Participants developed skills such as public speaking, news writing, interpersonal communication, delegation, human resource management, time management, coaching, goal-setting, working with different generations and ages, and many more. Additionally, participants learned about many current societal issues including land use planning, hunger and homelessness, ethnic and religious diversity, public policy development, immigration, trade, food security, federal farm policy, natural resource protection, sustainability, economic development, the global financial crisis, local food systems, infrastructure development, and others.Participants also had the opportunity to meet with and learn from leaders such as US Sen. Sherrod Brown; US Reps. Zack Space and Charlie Wilson; Ohio Reps. Mark Okey and John Domenick; Ohio State Senator Jason Wilson; Ohio Farm Bureau Federation Executive Vice President Jack Fisher; OSU Extension Director Dr. Keith Smith; and many more. Participants also “shadowed” local elected leaders for a day in order to learn about their jobs and challenges. The group even learned leadership lessons from Ohio State University football coach Jim Tressel and got a behind the scenes tour of Ohio Stadium.LEAD graduates from Harrison County include Don Jones of Freeport and Mike Hauber of Jewett.OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status.OSU Extension will provide accommodations to handicapped persons needing assistance to participate in Extension programs. If you require some type of assistance/accommodations to attend programs, utilize written materials, or visit the Harrison County Extension Office, please contact the Harrison Extension Office at 740-942-8823 or TTD # 1-800-589-8292.

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