Home Blog Page 445

Sterling helps rebuild hope in New Orleans

3
By AMY GAREIS
News-Herald Staff Writer
CADIZ – Rob Sterling is helping New Orleans recover from Hurricane Katrina, one house at a time.
For the past four years, the Harrison County Engineer has traveled with members of Emmanuel Lutheran Church in New Philadelphia to rebuild houses devastated during the fierce storm in 2005 that breached the levee at Lake Pontchartrain and left 80 percent of the city underwater.
The New Philadelphia church partnered with Grace Lutheran Church in New Orleans for the project, while other churches from Bolivar and Newcomerstown also participated.
Most recently, he spent three days in early February assisting Habitat For Humanity, which has reconstructed or constructed nearly 400 homes in New Orleans, although 22,000 were damaged by the hurricane. He said the homeowners themselves were required to pitch in and give 300 hours of service with the organization, including 100 hours or more on what would become their own residence.
He said the church group had aided roughly three-dozen projects in the past, most of which were restoring homes. This was the first year he built new ones under Habitat For Humanity’s umbrella.
He added that it gave him some satisfaction to make a difference, even though it was more of a working vacation. He also noticed a difference from 2006 to the present– a sense of optimism amid the devastation.
Look for the full story of Sterling’s service project and additional photos in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Helen Manbeck Johnson

0

Rev. Mrs. Helen Manbeck Johnson, died Feb. 11, 2010. She was born to the late Mary Rachel Harriman and Emerson C. Manbeck and celebrated her 87th birthday with family the previous day.
Public viewing will be held 12-2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20, 2010 at Koch Funeral Home, Scio. Due to the weather there will be no public graveside service, however on Saturday of Memorial Day weekend, a memorial service with liberal sharing of “Ouisie” stories, songs and scripture will held with a luncheon following. Venue will be announced at a later date.
A full obituary will appear in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Frank Edward Zeroski

0

Frank Edward Zeroski, 84, Adena, died Feb. 12, 2010 at Wheeling Hospital surrounded by his family. He was born Jan. 1, 1926, to Albert and Margaret (Waligura) Zeroski of Ramsey. Burial in Holly Memorial Gardens, Pleasant Grove.
A full obituary will appear in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

Helen L. Pugh

1

Helen L. Pugh, 102, died Monday, Feb. 15, 2010 at Wesleyan Village in Elyria. She was preceded in death by her husband, Eugene Pugh in 1978, her son Donald Pugh in 1988 and her daughter-law, Joyce Pugh, in 1999.
Funeral service will be held Thursday, Feb. 18, 2010 at Koch Funeral Home, Scio with the Rev. Karen Heyburn officiating.
A full obituary will appear in the next edition of the Harrison News-Herald.

LEAD program graduates first class

0
ST. CLAIRSVILLE – A new and innovative local leadership development program for agricultural and natural resources professionals recently graduated its first class of participants. In December, fifteen individuals from Carroll, Harrison, Jefferson, and Tuscarawas Counties graduated from the 14-month LEAD program at a graduation ceremony held at Dutch Valley Restaurant in Sugarcreek.
LEAD is an acronym for Leadership Education And Development. The program was developed by Ohio State University Extension and Ohio Farm Bureau in the four county areas, with a goal of increasing the pool of residents trained in leadership development. Crossroads RC&D provided fund-raising and project management support for the program. Local Farm Bureaus, businesses, and foundations provided financial support for the program.
“The goal of this program is to help local residents develop the skills needed to be successful in all types of leadership positions in their community, from PTO leaders and 4-H club advisors to county commissioners and school board members,” said Mike Hogan, OSU Extension Educator. “We were particularly interested in helping residents with agricultural backgrounds develop the skills necessary to move into local leadership positions,” added Hogan.
The program consisted of six different one and two day institutes, a state government study tour in Columbus and a federal government study tour in Washington DC. Participants developed skills such as public speaking, news writing, interpersonal communication, delegation, human resource management, time management, coaching, goal-setting, working with different generations and ages, and many more.
Additionally, participants learned about many current societal issues including land use planning, hunger and homelessness, ethnic and religious diversity, public policy development, immigration, trade, food security, federal farm policy, natural resource protection, sustainability, economic development, the global financial crisis, local food systems, infrastructure development, and others.
Participants also had the opportunity to meet with and learn from leaders such as US Sen. Sherrod Brown; US Reps. Zack Space and Charlie Wilson; Ohio Reps. Mark Okey and John Domenick; Ohio State Senator Jason Wilson; Ohio Farm Bureau Federation Executive Vice President Jack Fisher; OSU Extension Director Dr. Keith Smith; and many more. Participants also “shadowed” local elected leaders for a day in order to learn about their jobs and challenges. The group even learned leadership lessons from Ohio State University football coach Jim Tressel and got a behind the scenes tour of Ohio Stadium.
LEAD graduates from Harrison County include Don Jones of Freeport and Mike Hauber of Jewett.
OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status.
OSU Extension will provide accommodations to handicapped persons needing assistance to participate in Extension programs. If you require some type of assistance/accommodations to attend programs, utilize written materials, or visit the Harrison County Extension Office, please contact the Harrison Extension Office at 740-942-8823 or TTD # 1-800-589-8292.

LEAD program graduates first class
ST. CLAIRSVILLE – A new and innovative local leadership development program for agricultural and natural resources professionals recently graduated its first class of participants. In December, fifteen individuals from Carroll, Harrison, Jefferson, and Tuscarawas Counties graduated from the 14-month LEAD program at a graduation ceremony held at Dutch Valley Restaurant in Sugarcreek.LEAD is an acronym for Leadership Education And Development. The program was developed by Ohio State University Extension and Ohio Farm Bureau in the four county areas, with a goal of increasing the pool of residents trained in leadership development. Crossroads RC&D provided fund-raising and project management support for the program. Local Farm Bureaus, businesses, and foundations provided financial support for the program.“The goal of this program is to help local residents develop the skills needed to be successful in all types of leadership positions in their community, from PTO leaders and 4-H club advisors to county commissioners and school board members,” said Mike Hogan, OSU Extension Educator. “We were particularly interested in helping residents with agricultural backgrounds develop the skills necessary to move into local leadership positions,” added Hogan. The program consisted of six different one and two day institutes, a state government study tour in Columbus and a federal government study tour in Washington DC. Participants developed skills such as public speaking, news writing, interpersonal communication, delegation, human resource management, time management, coaching, goal-setting, working with different generations and ages, and many more. Additionally, participants learned about many current societal issues including land use planning, hunger and homelessness, ethnic and religious diversity, public policy development, immigration, trade, food security, federal farm policy, natural resource protection, sustainability, economic development, the global financial crisis, local food systems, infrastructure development, and others.Participants also had the opportunity to meet with and learn from leaders such as US Sen. Sherrod Brown; US Reps. Zack Space and Charlie Wilson; Ohio Reps. Mark Okey and John Domenick; Ohio State Senator Jason Wilson; Ohio Farm Bureau Federation Executive Vice President Jack Fisher; OSU Extension Director Dr. Keith Smith; and many more. Participants also “shadowed” local elected leaders for a day in order to learn about their jobs and challenges. The group even learned leadership lessons from Ohio State University football coach Jim Tressel and got a behind the scenes tour of Ohio Stadium.LEAD graduates from Harrison County include Don Jones of Freeport and Mike Hauber of Jewett.OSU Extension embraces human diversity and is committed to ensuring that all educational programs conducted by Ohio State University Extension are available to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, age, gender identity or expression, disability religion, sexual orientation, national origin, or veteran status.OSU Extension will provide accommodations to handicapped persons needing assistance to participate in Extension programs. If you require some type of assistance/accommodations to attend programs, utilize written materials, or visit the Harrison County Extension Office, please contact the Harrison Extension Office at 740-942-8823 or TTD # 1-800-589-8292.

Rosebud donation benefits Salvation Army

0
By AMY GAREIS
News-Herald Staff Writer
CADIZ – The Salvation Army will help more people through the harsh winter after Rosebud Mining Co. made a $4,000 contribution to the organization Tuesday.
Michael Jamison, general manager of Ohio operations, handed the check to Salvation Army Director Andy Hutyera, who said it capped off this year’s kettle campaign.
Hutyera said businesses have been very supportive and are helping to fill a growing need, especially with increasing unemployment numbers.
The check was icing on the cake after the organization raised nearly $18,000 through public donations and kettle collections at the conclusion of the campaign. Hutyera believed it was the most the effort has raised and was pleasantly surprised by the overwhelming response.
“We’re grateful for the good sponsors like Rosebud and think this is a good way to end the kettle drive,” he said.
Contributions may be made to the program, while the unit also has an endowment fund for further assistance. Interest from the fund supplies 60 percent of the budget but the kettles and contributions have been a further benefit. Funds have been used to pay for clients’ utility bills and help stock the Cadiz Food Pantry. Hutyera said 300 clients are helped per year, while the organization provides to the pantry on a monthly basis.
Meanwhile, Jamison said the company was simply giving back to the community.
“Rosebud wants to be a good neighbor in the community and help the Salvation Army. We see a bright future in the county, provided the government allows utilities to burn coal. I appreciate the work that Andy’s doing and what the Salvation Army does. We have an obligation to help those who are in need.”
He said company President J. Clifford Forrest authorized the donation because he believed in the Salvation Army and its mission.
“He thinks it’s doing good work and wants to support causes in this county,” Jamison commented.
For more information about giving or receiving help, call the Salvation Army at 740-942-4907.

Rosebud donation benefits Salvation Army
By AMY GAREISNews-Herald Staff Writer
CADIZ – The Salvation Army will help more people through the harsh winter after Rosebud Mining Co. made a $4,000 contribution to the organization Tuesday.Michael Jamison, general manager of Ohio operations, handed the check to Salvation Army Director Andy Hutyera, who said it capped off this year’s kettle campaign.Hutyera said businesses have been very supportive and are helping to fill a growing need, especially with increasing unemployment numbers. The check was icing on the cake after the organization raised nearly $18,000 through public donations and kettle collections at the conclusion of the campaign. Hutyera believed it was the most the effort has raised and was pleasantly surprised by the overwhelming response.“We’re grateful for the good sponsors like Rosebud and think this is a good way to end the kettle drive,” he said. Contributions may be made to the program, while the unit also has an endowment fund for further assistance. Interest from the fund supplies 60 percent of the budget but the kettles and contributions have been a further benefit. Funds have been used to pay for clients’ utility bills and help stock the Cadiz Food Pantry. Hutyera said 300 clients are helped per year, while the organization provides to the pantry on a monthly basis.Meanwhile, Jamison said the company was simply giving back to the community.“Rosebud wants to be a good neighbor in the community and help the Salvation Army. We see a bright future in the county, provided the government allows utilities to burn coal. I appreciate the work that Andy’s doing and what the Salvation Army does. We have an obligation to help those who are in need.”He said company President J. Clifford Forrest authorized the donation because he believed in the Salvation Army and its mission.“He thinks it’s doing good work and wants to support causes in this county,” Jamison commented.For more information about giving or receiving help, call the Salvation Army at 740-942-4907.

Jewett UMC has the spirit of giving

0
By ROBERT A. DEFRANK
News-Herald Staff Writer
JEWETT – The Jewett United Methodist Church has been busy this holiday working with volunteers from across the community to help villagers enjoy some extra comforts during the season.
Tyna Patterson has been raising funds, purchasing and distributing toys for children with the help of the church for many years. About two years ago she teamed up with Freedom Curtis of People Helping People, a ministry inspired by her daughter Savannah. Proceeds from Curtis’ yard sale this fall went toward the toys. “The result has been a blessing and an abundance of toys to be distributed with the JUMC Christmas Baskets,” said Pastor Hester Hudson.
“This year, once again we assembled 50 (boxes), but we provided for more people than last year. Some boxes were for two families now living together or for grandparents and grandchildren. Each year the need grows, but we have been blessed with those willing to work with and through this ministry making it possible to provide an abundance of food and toys for the families,” said Hudson. Two crews from the congregation, in two days, assisted in packing the boxes.
In addition, Jewett’s UMC youth group, Helping Hands, was among those who livened up the holiday spirit by caroling through town. They take on various mission projects such as picking up litter around the village, doing chores around the church, making cards and gifts for the service personnel overseas and raising money for missionary Mindee Wright.
The youth group is presently recycling bottles and cans to raise money for mission projects. In the spring, they plan to help with the Jewett village cleanup project.
The Jewett United Methodist Church would like to thank all who contributed and labored. These include the Jewett Food Cupboard, The Village of Jewett and the village employees, Kids Inc., The Harrison-Jewett Elementary School, Faith Heaven Farm, Tyna Patterson and Freedom Curtis, New Rumley UM Church, Bethel UM Church, Reisbecks, private and anonymous donors. Funds were also raised through the JUMC Day Camp Duck Race and JUMC Thanksgiving Love Loaves for the baskets. Pastor Hudson also thanks all the faithful members of the congregation for their generous giving of time and gifts.

Jewett UMC has the spirit of giving
By ROBERT A. DEFRANKNews-Herald Staff Writer  JEWETT – The Jewett United Methodist Church has been busy this holiday working with volunteers from across the community to help villagers enjoy some extra comforts during the season. Tyna Patterson has been raising funds, purchasing and distributing toys for children with the help of the church for many years. About two years ago she teamed up with Freedom Curtis of People Helping People, a ministry inspired by her daughter Savannah. Proceeds from Curtis’ yard sale this fall went toward the toys. “The result has been a blessing and an abundance of toys to be distributed with the JUMC Christmas Baskets,” said Pastor Hester Hudson.“This year, once again we assembled 50 (boxes), but we provided for more people than last year. Some boxes were for two families now living together or for grandparents and grandchildren. Each year the need grows, but we have been blessed with those willing to work with and through this ministry making it possible to provide an abundance of food and toys for the families,” said Hudson. Two crews from the congregation, in two days, assisted in packing the boxes. In addition, Jewett’s UMC youth group, Helping Hands, was among those who livened up the holiday spirit by caroling through town. They take on various mission projects such as picking up litter around the village, doing chores around the church, making cards and gifts for the service personnel overseas and raising money for missionary Mindee Wright.The youth group is presently recycling bottles and cans to raise money for mission projects. In the spring, they plan to help with the Jewett village cleanup project.The Jewett United Methodist Church would like to thank all who contributed and labored. These include the Jewett Food Cupboard, The Village of Jewett and the village employees, Kids Inc., The Harrison-Jewett Elementary School, Faith Heaven Farm, Tyna Patterson and Freedom Curtis, New Rumley UM Church, Bethel UM Church, Reisbecks, private and anonymous donors. Funds were also raised through the JUMC Day Camp Duck Race and JUMC Thanksgiving Love Loaves for the baskets. Pastor Hudson also thanks all the faithful members of the congregation for their generous giving of time and gifts.

Jewett council starts off the new year

1
By ROBERT A. DEFRANK
JEWETT – Jewett village council started its first meeting of 2010 with a review of policies and welcomed a new council member at the Jan. 6 meeting.
New council member Ed Stark also attended his first meeting since being sworn in the previous Saturday. Stark, a first-time council member has a background in the coalfields and experience in the regular Army and National Guard.
His goals include finding more ways to utilize the park, repairs to roads and alleys.
For 2009, Police Chief Ron Carter reported 149 public service calls, 94 incident reports, 234 traffic stops, 119 traffic offenses cited, five crashes, three counts of domestic violence, six counts of theft, seven counts of breaking and entering, 852.1 gallons of fuel used, one notification of children’s services, 16 subjects jailed, one count vandalism, 16 court appearances, 33 drug items seized, four drug raids, and 12 subjects arrested on warrants.
New tires on the police cars will be purchased for $500.
In addition, Water Superintendent Patti Gross reported water and wastewater income of $17,867.90
In other matters, council authorized the purchase of new tires for the water truck for $500. They will look into tire providers. Council will order a new edge for the snowplow, wipers, motor, and order more salt.
Council also altered purchasing policies. $500 will be set aside monthly for water and street purchases.
Employees will be allotted $600 per year for clothing. Sick pay and benefits will also be established.
Council President Roger Walters recommended reviewing the employee handbook, noting it had not been updated for about three years. He also pointed out that the lagoon might need a storage area nearby for emergency equipment.
Mayor Dwight Busby noted council would adopt the Ohio Revised Code when it arrives.
Thanks went out to Stark and Allard Webb for their work in decorating the bridge, pavilion and park for the holiday season.
The temporary budget was set at $613,500.
A finance meeting will be set for 5 p.m. at the Jewett village office Jan. 11.

Warden E. Banks Speaks at BCC

0

ST. CLAIRSVILLE – Junior and senior students of the Belmont Career Center were given the opportunity to hear first hand the duties of a Warden in the Ohio correctional system. On Wednesday December 11th, Warden Edward Banks of the Noble Correctional Institution visited the school and addressed the Law Enforcement Class in what has become an annual presentation.
For the past six years, class commander Brandt Mazeroski has incorporated Banks’ experience into the class curriculum. In addition to an informal question and answer session, students were briefed on employment criteria, organizational culture and institutional operations. The warden said that he hoped that the professional working relationship that he and Mazeroski had developed has been helpful to the students at the Career Center.
“I look forward to this event each year as it provides an opportunity to hopefully assist the students with future career decisions and share the vision of our agency, said Banks.”
Banks took over the Warden position in Noble County after serving 10 months as warden in Nelsonville, Ohio at the Hocking Correctional Facility.
A Cadiz native, Ed has worked with the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction since 1994.

Harrison News-Herald Fake ID in Ohio

In Ohio (and other US states), fake documents are very popular among young people. The reason is simple - alcohol. In America, it is impossible for students to buy booze until they are 21 years old. To do this, young people and girls buy fake documents on sites like id-hurry using cryptocurrencies. .